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Knowing The Right Time For Senior Assisted Living

Knowing the right time to consider assisted living for a loved one is often a difficult process. It can seem challenging to find trusted guidance, and family members often feel guilt or other strong emotions when thinking about the prospect of taking this step. We believe that providing people with information about a variety of considerations can help them make the best decision possible for their loved ones.

We’ve developed this short, 2 minute questionnaire to help provide basic information that can be helpful in understanding some of the general issues you may be facing and next steps you can take.

PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE/MEMORY CARE ASSESSMENT

Does your loved one have difficulty managing instrumental activities of in-home daily living, such as dressing, cooking, and doing laundry?

Does your parent or senior have difficulty driving, using public transportation, or accomplishing out-of-the-home activities such as shopping?

Are they challenged either mentally or physically to properly and easily use the restroom be it cleaning themselves or possess the ability to get on or off the toilet?

Are there significant changes in eating habits (forgetting to eat or drink) or significant weight gain or weight loss within a 10-15 day period?

Are you noticing a change in memory or short-term memory loss?

Are they maintaining basic personal hygiene such as bathing/showering grooming, nail and oral care?

SENIOR INJURY PREVENTION and HEALTH RECOVERY

Did your loved one fall, have a medical scare, or get in a fender bender (or worse)?

Did they have a slower recovery than normal from their last common illness (such as flu or bronchitis)?

Do they have increased difficulties with hearing and vision?

Do they have difficulty with speech, word finding, reading, or writing?

Are they moving slower than usual, having difficulty balancing or climbing stairs, avoiding moving around or common activities altogether?

Do they have a chronic health condition that’s worsening?

Do they have difficulty managing medications?

Does your loved one still get together for lunches or outings with friends and neighbors?

Have they reduced time spent on activities and interests?

Are they spending significantly more time in the home?

Does someone come to visit them on a frequent basis (twice or more per week)?

Is your senior or parent or loved one still have the ability to dress or undress oneself and choose appropriate attire for social situations?